Severity of Chronic Periodontitis Directly Related to Severity of Heart Attacks - OralSystemicLink.pro

Severity of Chronic Periodontitis Directly Related to Severity of Heart Attacks

Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, cialis sale pills Sim K. Singhrao, cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, cialis sale pills Sim K. Singhrao, cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sale purchase Sim K. Singhrao, for sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, search Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, cialis sale pills Sim K. Singhrao, cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sale purchase Sim K. Singhrao, for sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, search Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, discount viagra treat Sim K. Singhrao, Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, cialis sale pills Sim K. Singhrao, cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sale purchase Sim K. Singhrao, for sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, search Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, discount viagra treat Sim K. Singhrao, Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, best cialis remedy Sim K. Singhrao, viagra canada Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, cialis sale pills Sim K. Singhrao, cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sale purchase Sim K. Singhrao, for sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, search Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, discount viagra treat Sim K. Singhrao, Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, best cialis remedy Sim K. Singhrao, viagra canada Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
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Article: “Active Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Infection-Induced Complement Activation in ApoE-/- Mice Brains”
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, best viagra no rx Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra generic seek Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

1Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
2Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Abstract

Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:
Sophie Poole1, cialis usa treat Sim K. Singhrao1, viagra cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli2, Mercedes Rivera2, Irina Velsko2, Lakshmyya Kesavalu2, 3, StJohn Crean1

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sales physician Sim K. Singhrao, viagra cialis sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, discount cialis medicine Sim K. Singhrao, viagra sales online Sasanka Chukkapalli, ask
Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.


Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Authors:

Sophie Poole, generic viagra online Sim K. Singhrao, discount viagra Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, cialis sale pills Sim K. Singhrao, cialis Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, viagra sale purchase Sim K. Singhrao, for sale Sasanka Chukkapalli, search Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, discount viagra treat Sim K. Singhrao, Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
Journal of Alzheimer's DiseaseAuthors:

Sophie Poole, best cialis remedy Sim K. Singhrao, viagra canada Sasanka Chukkapalli, Mercedes Rivera, Irina Velsko, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, St John Crean

Oral & Dental Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

“Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

Visit The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease website for the full article
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Scientific studies, viagra sales rx ongoing research, and further information on the Oral Systemic Link

Heart Attack and Stroke

Website: The Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention Center

Cancer

Article: Oral Bacteria and Colo-rectal Cancer by Dr. Yiping Han

Article: Oral Bacteria and Cancer by Sarah E. Whitmore and Richard J. Lamont

Article: Examining the Association between Oral Health and Oral HPV Infection” by Thanh Cong Bui, troche Christine M Markham, Michael Wallis Ross, and Patricia Dolan Mullen

Article: Periodontal Disease with Treatment Reduces Subsequent Cancer Risks” by Hwang IM, Sun LM, Lin CL, Lee CF, Kao CH

Oral Cancer

Oral Cancer Foundation brochure available for online purchase:
http://www.ocfstore.org/Educational_Oral_Cancer_Products_s/3.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention fact sheet entitled “Human Papillomavirus and Oropharyngeal Cancer” print version available for download from CDC site:
http://www.cdc.gov/std/HPV/facts-brochures.htm

Oral Cancer Cause brochure available for online purchase:
http://oralcancercause.org/product/education-brochures/

Six Step Screening postcards and posters available for online purchase:
http://www.sixstepscreening.org/store/

Health Canada publication SMILE: Healthy Teeth, purchase Healthy Body. To obtain printed copies of the document (limit of 50 copies per order), contact publications@hc-sc.gc.ca

“Your Quick Guide to Facts on Sexuality and HPV” and “It’s Time to Talk about “It”. Test What You Know. Your Sexual Health Education Workbook.” Both are available for online purchase at http://www.hpvinfo.ca/health-care-professionals/order-online/
Vaccination poster available online: http://sexualityandu.ca/uploads/files/HPV_2013_Web_E.pdf

CDHA clinical practice and patient education forms including oral cancer fact sheet, brochure and lesion documentation form are all being updated. The fact sheet is available online: http://www.cdha.ca/pdfs/OralCare/factSheet_print_noCrop_en.pdf All other resources will be made available in March 2015.

LED Imaging (VELscope) clinical resources and client education materials available for download:
http://www.leddental.com/education/downloads-center/

Philips Oral Healthcare CARE tool (Customized Assessment and Risk Evaluator) web-based client interview and integration of risk management program into dental hygiene clinical practice: http://www.takacslearningcenter.com/thriving-dentist-show/page/3/ or download podcast from iTunes.

Respiratory

Article: “Oral Biofilms, Periodontitis, and Pulmonary Infections” – article by S. Paju and FA Scannapieco

Article: Periodontal Disease and Respiratory Disease: a Systematic Review of the Evidence” by Brooke Agado and Denise Bowen

Article: Role of Oral Bacteria in Respiratory Infection” by Dr. Frank A. Scannapieco

Dementia

Article: “Active Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Infection-Induced Complement Activation in ApoE-/- Mice Brains”
UoG Periodontitis and Heart Attacks

“Researchers at the University of Granada prove that the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis is directly related to the severity of myocardial infarction

This research, viagra sale published in the Journal of Dental Research, cialis buy surveyed 112 patients who had suffered from an acute case of myocardial infarction. These patients underwent a series of cardiological, biochemical and periodontal health checks and tests.

Researchers from the University of Granada have demonstrated for the first time that chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory gum disease which provokes gradual teeth loss, is closely related to the severity of acute myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack.

In a pioneering research, published in the prestigious Journal of Dental Research, and titled “Acute myocardial infarct size is related to periodontitis extent and severity”, this team have demonstrated that the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis is related to the size of acute myocardial infarction through seric levels of troponin I and myoglobin (biomarkers of myocardial necrosis).

This research results in part from the conclusions of Rafael Martín Marfil Álvarez’s doctoral dissertation, which was directed by UGR professors Francisco Mesa Aguado (Stomatology Department), José Antonio Ramírez Hernández (Medicine Department), and Andrés Catena Martínez (Experimental Psychology Department). This research analysed 112 patients who had suffered from acute myocardial infarction, at the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital Cardiology Unit. They all underwent a series of cardiological, biochemical and periodontal health checks and tests.

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